OHS Program of Study

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of the list of course descriptions on the following pages, with the requirements for graduation, is to assist students in planning their work strategically. It is hoped that parents will take an active role in helping plan the program with their students. In many cases, personal conferences with a school counselor are helpful in determining the courses in which a student should enroll.

Graduation Requirements

English: 4     (includes successful completion of research portfolio)
Mathematics: 4
Science: 3
Social Studies: 4    (to include .5 credit American history and .5 credit American government for all and a .5 credit world history beginning with the class of 2021)
Health: .5
Physical Education: .5   (.25 per semester)
Fine Arts: 1    (this requirement can be met in 7th & 8th grade)
Additional Electives: 5
Total Minimum: 22

*Students are required to take Ohio’s State Tests, meeting specific performance criteria to receive a diploma and to participate in commencement.  Students will take all seven of Ohio’s State Tests toward the completion of the respective course. For each test, a student earns a score from one to five (1-5). Students need to earn at least eighteen (18) total points out of a possible thirty-five (35), with at least four (4) points in English, four (4) points in mathematics, six (6) points in science and social studies, and four (4) additional points from any of the seven tests.

Subject

Test

Course

Grade

English

English/

Language Arts I

English I, English I H

9

 

English/

Language Arts II

English II, English II H, English II HH

10

Mathematics

Algebra I

Algebra I H, Algebra I

8, 9

 

Geometry

Geometry H, Geometry

9, 10

Science

Biology

Biology, Biology in Society

9, 10

 

Social Studies

American History

American History or AP US History

10

 

American Government

Civics: American Government/Economics or AP American Government and Politics 

11, 12

 

If a student does not meet the testing requirement on Ohio’s State Tests, it is possible to meet one or more of the testing requirements by earning specified grades in College Credit Plus courses, by performance on certain AP exams, by earning a remediation-free score on the ACT or SAT, or by earning a composite score of thirteen (13) on the WorkKeys and an approved industry-recognized credential. Please see the Ohio Department of Education’s website for updated information on these requirements by going to: http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Ohio-Graduation-Requirements.

All students will take the ACT college-admission test during the spring of their junior year that will be paid for by the state of Ohio.

*Ohio Core Requirements according to Senate Bill 311:

  • Students must receive instruction in economics and financial literacy during grades 9-12.

  • Students must complete at least one year of fine arts taken any time in grades 7-12.  If taken during the 7th and 8th grades, students will meet the CORE requirement, however, they will not earn high school credit.

  • Students will earn 3 credits of science with the following emphasis:  1 physical science credit, 1 life science credit, and 1 credit in an advanced science.

  • Elective units must include one sequence or any combination of foreign language, fine arts, business, career-technical education, family and consumer sciences, technology, English language arts, mathematics, science, or social studies courses not otherwise required, for a total of five units.

  • Mathematics units must include 1 unit of Algebra II or the equivalent of Algebra II

Table of Contents

You can scroll down through this online version of the Program of Study or click on the topics in the Table of Contents and go directly to that topic.

Academic Honors Diploma

Students may qualify for an “Academic Honors Diploma”.  The following criteria have been adopted by the State Department of Education for this diploma:

To be awarded an “Academic Honors Diploma,” the student (Classes of 2018, 2019 and 2020) may choose to pursue the diploma by meeting the following requirements:

  1. Successfully complete the requirements for graduation as established by the Oakwood Board of Education.

  2. Successfully meet ALL BUT ONE of the following criteria:

    1. Earn four units of English

    2. Earn four units of mathematics, including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II or equivalent and another higher level course or a four-year sequence of courses that contain equivalent content

    3. Earn four units of science, including physics and chemistry

    4. Earn four units of social studies

    5. Earn either three units of one world language or two units each of two world languages

    6. Earn one unit of fine arts (must be earned in high school)

    7. Maintain an overall high school grade point average of at least 3.5 on a four point scale up to the last grading period of the senior year

    8. Obtain a composite score of 27 on the American College Test (ACT) or a score of 1280 on the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT).     

Criteria for an “Academic Honors Diploma” for students in the Class of 2021 and current career education students differ from those listed above and will be shared with those students in the fall.  Students also have the opportunity to choose to pursue one of the additional Honors Diplomas as defined on the Ohio Department of Education website at: https://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Ohio-s-Graduation-Requirements/Honors-Diplomas.  The additional Honors Diplomas available for Oakwood students to pursue include: Career Tech Honors Diploma, STEM Honors Diploma, Arts Honors Diploma*, Social Science and Civic Engagement Honors Diploma.

College Entrance

College entrance requirements vary. The following courses are recommended for a strong college preparatory program:

  • 4 units of English

  • 4 units of college preparatory mathematics

  • At least 3 units of one world language or 2 units each of two world languages

  • 4 units of social studies

  • 3-4 units of science (to include biology, chemistry and physics)

Some colleges expect more requirements and some less from applicants. Most engineering schools, for example, require 4-5 units of college preparatory mathematics plus physics and chemistry. Most colleges indicate that 16 or more academic credits are preferred for an applicant to be adequately prepared for college.

Each student is advised to study the entrance requirements of the colleges being considered and plan courses accordingly. Oakwood High School provides courses necessary to prepare students for college.

The college, when considering a person for admission, is usually concerned with the overall qualifications of the applicant. Emphasis is placed on such things as the quality and type of the high school preparation (grades and rigor of courses taken), scores on college admission tests (SAT and ACT), motivation, high school and community activities, and recommendations from teachers, counselors and/or the principal.  During the registration process, students may request their scores be sent to up to 4 universities for free. Sending them after the exam will cost approximately $15 per test, per school.

The college enrollment picture is a changing one. Some colleges, because of the large number of applicants, can still be selective in admissions; others cannot because of lack of qualified applicants. Some students, either because of cost or because of admission policies, are going to find it wise to begin their college career in a two-year community or junior college. Early planning, intelligent choice of subjects, and strong academic scholarship are very important to students who are considering multiple colleges their senior year.

Minimum Standard Program

The minimum standard program at Oakwood High School each year is 5.50 credits/periods.  A note of explanation approved by the student’s counselor and the principal is required if the student wishes to take fewer than the minimum number of credits/periods.  Illnesses or disabilities are generally the only reasons considered for reducing the program.

Homeroom/Grade Level Assignment

Tenth grade assignment requires a total of 5.50 credits. Eleventh grade assignment requires 11 credits. Twelfth grade assignment requires 16.50 credits or projected to receive 22 credits by the end of the senior year.

Summer School Credit

A student may take extra courses during the summer. Students may take the equivalent of only one-quarter credit of physical education in summer school. Credit earned in summer school does not reduce the minimum required load (5.5 credits/periods) for the regular school year.

Grade Point Average

Grade Point Averages (GPA) are calculated at the end of each semester. Semester grades in all regular courses for which credit is granted are included in determining GPA with the exception of course work taken by tutoring, independent study, audit, and pass/fail.  Grades in regular courses earn the following quality points: A = 4 (92-100), B = 3 (83-91), C = 2 (74-82), D = 1 (65-73), and F= 0 (below 65). Advanced Placement courses earn an “add-on” factor if the course is completed with an A, B, or C. The “add-on” factor is .05 for each course (.025 per semester).  Board policy requires that AP students take the AP test in order to earn “add-on” credit. Students enrolled in honors and high honors (AP prep) courses in English and mathematics receive no extra weighting for grades earned. Students earning credit through College Credit Plus (CCP) will earn the .05 “add-on” to their cumulative GPA.  Only CCP courses with an equivalent Advanced Placement course content area will qualify for the add-on.

Formula for GPA = Total Quality Points divided by Credits attempted, plus any “add-on” points earned.

Courses may not be audited unless the student is repeating a course taken earlier.  Grades earned in audit courses are not included in class rank and GPA.

Students transferring into Oakwood High School from other accredited public and/or private schools do have their grades from the former school used in determining grade point average. Only AP and CCP courses are given an “add-on” to the GPA. Weighted grades for college preparatory courses, honors, or other designations from a former high school are not included in determining GPA.

In order to be designated class valedictorian or salutatorian, a candidate for graduation must have attended Oakwood High School as a full-time student for no less than three semesters during any of the sophomore, junior or senior years. The valedictorian(s) and salutatorian(s) will be named at the end of the third grading period during their senior year. Final calculation will include third quarter grades as projected second semester averages and the ‘’add-on” factor for all AP and CCP courses.  Early graduates are not eligible to be designated class valedictorian or salutatorian.

Because of the tradition of academic rigor and the competitive educational environment at Oakwood High School, the school does not rank its students.

Honors and Advanced Placement Courses

Honors courses are currently offered in English, Mathematics, French and Spanish. Honors courses involve enriched and advanced work, rigorous grading standards, and selective admissions. Factors used in selecting students for honors and AP courses will include teacher/department recommendation, counselor recommendation, grades in previous courses, achievement/aptitude test scores, and student interest.

Formal Advanced Placement (AP) programs in English Language and Composition, English Literature and Composition, French, Spanish, Calculus, Statistics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, American History, European History, American Government, Comparative Government and Politics, Studio Art, World History, and Music Theory are offered.  AP exams are given in May of each year. Scores earned on these tests could result in college credit, advanced placement or exemption from certain academic requirements/prerequisites upon enrollment at most colleges. Full year Advanced Placement (AP) courses receive .05 “add-on” credit and semester Advanced Placement (AP) courses receive .025 “add on” credit. Board policy requires that AP students take the AP test and earn at least a C in the class in order to earn “add-on” credit. Any student may take any of the AP exams without being enrolled in Advanced Placement classes.  However, students will not receive add-on credit for taking the AP test without having taken the course.

As transcripts are forwarded to colleges, grades in honors/AP courses are identified on the official transcript. Colleges expect students to take advantage of stronger and more challenging programs if the opportunity exists. For more information concerning these special programs contact the guidance department.

Educational Options

Several educational options that vary from the standard college preparatory program exist.  These options are intended to provide for different individual needs, different educational goals and objectives and for non-school related educational experiences.

A.  Career Education Programs

Participation in a state approved career education program is available on an allotment basis to Oakwood students through a contractual agreement with the Kettering and Centerville school districts. One and two-year programs are available as well as some individual courses.

B.  Independent Study

Independent Study is defined as a learning experience or project that is completed by a student outside the structure and limits of the usual classroom setting.

Credit for independent study may be granted if certain requirements and conditions are met:

  1. The content/subject matter of the project cannot be acquired in a regularly scheduled class.

  2. The student, teacher and the counselor mutually agree on the curriculum that has been identified with stipulated objectives to be accomplished.

  3. A teacher agrees to assume responsibility for meeting with, assisting, and guiding the student toward accomplishment of the objectives.  The teacher and the student coordinate meeting times.

  4. Amount of credit to be granted for the project and requirements to be met for a pass/fail grade are mutually agreed upon before the program project is accepted and approved.

  5. The burden of responsibility rests with the student in the accomplishment and completion of the objectives of the independent project.

  6. All independent study courses will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

  7. An application for approval of an anticipated independent study project must be submitted in writing with the limits of the project identified, objectives identified, time to be devoted to the completion of the project, amount of credit and grade requirements identified. The application must be signed by the student, parent, teacher who has accepted responsibility for supervising the independent study project, department chair, counselor, and approved by the principal. Applications are available in the office.  Applications must be completed and submitted by the end of the third week of each semester.

  8. Credit earned is not used in computing grade point average.

C.   College Credit Plus

Ohio’s CCP program allows students to earn college and high school credits at the same time by taking college courses from community colleges or universities. The purpose of this program is to promote rigorous academic pursuits and to provide a wide variety of options to college-ready students. There is no fee for tuition and books for the student and their family.

A 3-semester hour college course translates to 1 high school credit.

Several CCP courses are offered through an agreement with local colleges and universities at Oakwood High School. Additionally, there are options for students to take courses either online or on a college campus.  

In order for students to participate in CCP, students and parents must:

  • Attend the CCP Information session at Oakwood High School in February

  • If unable to attend, arrangements must be made through the Guidance Office for a session

  • Turn in the Intent to Participate Form to the Guidance Office no later than April 1

  • Apply to local community colleges or universities for acceptance on or before May 1  

  • Complete any placement tests required by the community colleges or universities by their deadlines

  • Be accepted by local colleges or universities

D.  On-Line Coursework   

Students have a plethora of opportunities for on-line study. Students are encouraged to work with their school counselor when considering this option. It is the responsibility of the student and their parents to receive approval from the principal before utilizing any of the on-line providers.  Grades and credits for all on-line coursework will be recorded on the student’s permanent record. Grades will be recorded and will be used in calculation of the grade point average.

E. Early Graduation

Students are encouraged to attain their high school diploma over a four-year period. Some situations may make it desirable or necessary that a student consider completion of the high school program in less than four years.  Any student planning to graduate early must have his/her academic plan approved by the school counselor, principal, and the student’s parents. Early graduates are welcome to participate in the commencement ceremony only if they haven’t requested and accepted their diploma prior to the ceremony.

F.  Credit Flexibility   

Credit flexibility options are designed for those students who demonstrate the ability, interest, and maturity to accept personal responsibility for their learning in a selected curricular area and have the opportunity to pursue it outside of Oakwood High School. The credit flexibility option supports learners who conduct their own research, learning objectives, and stipulate a plan to accomplish the defined objectives outside of the traditional classroom. The policy provides a personalized educational opportunity for all students and helps them identify, acquire, and demonstrate the proficiency of their knowledge through standards to earn graduation credit. Students participate in an alternative learning experience beyond the boundaries of a classroom and demonstrate identified standards. Students must complete the Proposal for Credit Flexibility Form (see school counselor), define their educational goals, identify the standards they will demonstrate, and create a timeline for completion.  With the approval of Oakwood City Schools, students can collaborate with an approved off-site instructional provider. Students should be aware that the NCAA Clearinghouse might not accept Credit Flex Course options.  The deadline to apply for credit flex for the 2018-2019 school year is May 1, 2018 for first semester and November 1, 2018 for second semester.

Schedule Changes

The following guidelines will be used by the guidance department when considering a request for changes in a student’s schedule. Please consider course selections carefully to avoid unnecessary schedule changes. Schedule changes may be limited by availability of classes, course conflicts, class size and balance of class sizes.  If a course change is made after grades have been recorded, the grades from the first course will transfer to the new course to be averaged.

Year Courses:

  1. A change to another full-year course may be made during the first two weeks of the first semester.

  2. A drop/withdrawal before the end of the first nine-week grade period will not show on record as course attempted.

  3. A drop/withdrawal during the second quarter will show a “W” on the report card.

  4. A drop/withdrawal in the third quarter will show a “W” on the report card and a “W” for the second semester and final grade on the report card as well as on the transcript.  A yearlong course will not receive partial credit or a first semester grade.

  5. A drop/withdrawal from full-credit courses will not be made in the fourth nine-week grading period.

Semester Courses:

  1. A change to another semester course may be made during the first week of the semester.

  2. A drop/withdrawal before the end of first nine weeks of the semester will not show on record as course attempted.

  3. A drop/withdrawal after the end of the first nine weeks will be recorded as follows:  the first nine-week grade will be recorded on the report card. A “W” will be recorded on the report card for the second nine-week grade and for the semester grade on the report card as well as the transcript.

  4. A drop/withdrawal from semester courses will not be made after the twelfth week of the semester.

Minimum Class Enrollment

If during registration and/or final scheduling for classes, the number of students requesting a course falls below ten, a careful evaluation will be made of all factors associated with offering the course. The Board of Education will be advised of all these factors prior to determining the feasibility of dropping the course from the program offerings.

Fees and Supplies

A number of courses require a lab fee and/or the purchase of workbooks, supplies, or paperback books. Fees will be included on student schedules.  All books and supplies may be purchased in our bookstore located in the senior hall. Class fees are also paid at the bookstore. Some materials will not be needed immediately in classes and may be purchased anytime throughout the school year.  Any family in need of financial assistance with class fees or supplemental materials should contact the principal or counselor. All requests for financial assistance will be confidential.

Specialized Education Programs and Services

Oakwood Junior/Senior High School offers a continuum of program options under the umbrella of IDEA and ADA for students with special needs as outlined in their Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) or 504 Plans. All students with disabilities are included in general education classes as much as appropriate.  Supports and services for students with identified needs are offered in the general education classroom, resource room, and through community-based learning designed to teach skills leading to adult independence. The OJHS/OHS Intervention Specialists serve in several capacities for identified students: as a coordinator for vocational training within the community, as resource room teachers to provide direct instruction to qualifying students, and as collaborative teachers present with a general educator in the classroom to provide necessary modifications and accommodations for students.  Resource classes in math, English, science, social studies, and academic transitions, are available for students with IEPs. Academic transitions instruction is provided through a Transitions Learning Center, a semester class where students can earn a .5 elective credit.  Class instruction focuses on one’s transition goals outlined in his/her IEP to include: identifying learning styles, study skills, organizational strategies, memory skills strategies, goal setting, beginning the career assessment process, etc. Students will also be given the opportunity to complete homework, and study for tests/quizzes.

Speech and language services, hearing intervention services, vision intervention services, orientation and mobility services, adaptive physical education, physical therapy and occupational therapy are also available for students with identified needs.  In addition, oral interpreters and aides assist students when appropriate. Support services that best meet the needs of limited English proficient (LEP) students are available to English Learner (EL) students whose primary or home language is other than English who need special language assistance in order to effectively participate in school instructional programs.  Students must be evaluated and qualify as limited English proficient (LEP) and needing special language help and services through an assessment process. Upon enrollment, families complete a Home Language Survey. Students whose home language is other than English are assessed by the English as a Second Language (SL) Instructor. Results are shared with families, and EL support is offered if the student qualifies.  For more information concerning special education programs and services, contact our Special Education Supervisor at 297-7803.

Gifted Identification and Services

The Oakwood Board of Education has adopted a policy, in accordance with Ohio Revised Code 3324.01-3324.07 and Ohio Administrative Code, for identifying children who are gifted. The state mandates that all students have the opportunity to be assessed for possible "giftedness" based on the state's specific definition of giftedness, which follows:   

Children who perform or show potential for performing at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared to others of their age, experience, or environment and who are identified in the areas of superior cognitive domain, specific academic domain (math, science, social studies, reading/writing), creative thinking domain, and/or visual/performing arts domain (visual arts, music, dance, drama).

The district uses an approach of assessment and identification to identify students who perform, or show potential for performing, at high levels of accomplishment in these domains. To be identified as "gifted" a student must achieve the requisite cutoff score on an assessment instrument authorized by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), which sets cutoff scores.  Children may participate in either whole-grade assessment or referral-based assessment. Whole-grade level assessment occurs at grades 2, 4, and 6 in Oakwood City School District. For referral-based assessment, children may be referred for possible gifted identification on an ongoing basis based upon child request (self-referral), teacher recommendation, parent/guardian request, child referral of peer, or other referral. Referral forms are available in the school offices, Gifted Intervention Specialists’ offices, and counselors’ offices.

While the State of Ohio requires that students have the opportunity to be assessed for giftedness, it does not require districts to provide services for students who are identified as gifted. Through local tax dollars, Oakwood employs three (3) Gifted Intervention Specialists (GIS) who assist teachers at Lange, Harman, Smith, and the Junior/Senior High Schools in working with students identified as gifted.

The gifted services revolve around instructional activities for students who have been identified in each of the four domains of giftedness defined by the state of Ohio. The district ensures equal opportunity for all students identified as gifted to receive services offered by the district. Additionally, students who participate in gifted services are guided by the development and implementation of Written Education Plans (WEPs) that document student data, goals, and progress.   Differentiated instruction in the classroom is the linchpin of the program. Differentiated instruction requires modifying process, content, or product according to student need, readiness, and interest, and it is often performed in consultation with the Gifted Intervention Specialist. Our instructional program at all levels continues to evolve in order to meet the needs of our learners, and annually revised gifted services matrices are available from the Gifted Intervention Specialists.

At the secondary level, we offer services to students identified as gifted through curricular offerings, including enrichment electives, honors and Advanced Placement courses, cluster-grouping, co-teaching models and educational options.  For more information regarding this program, contact the Gifted Intervention Specialist at 297-5328.

Career Education Programs

The following career programs are available in the Kettering and Centerville school districts at no charge to Oakwood students. Most programs begin during the junior year, culminating the senior year.  The programs typically involve a half-day at either Centerville High School or Fairmont High School while the student remains in their college prep curriculum at Oakwood High School. A student enrolled in one of these programs will receive his/her diploma from Oakwood High School.  The Oakwood Board of Education, except for programs where a student must report to a job station, will provide transportation. Allotted spaces for Oakwood students will be filled by approval of the career education coordinator, counselor and/or administrator. These programs are designed to give students the education, background and training necessary for skills that will enable them, upon graduation from high school, to further their education in college, enter the world of work, or serve in the military.  Students must meet certain criteria in order to participate in these programs. In most of the programs, students may earn college as well as high school credit. See the guidance department for specific information and detailed course descriptions.

*     Aerospace Engineering, FHS
*     Allied Health, FHS
*     Automotive Technology, FHS
*     Biotechnology, FHS & CHS
*     Business Academy, FHS
*     Centerville Business Academy, CHS
*     Communication Arts/Broadcast Management, CHS
*     Construction Trades, FHS
*     Culinary Arts and Restaurant Management, CHS
*     Digital Design, FHS
*     Early Childhood Education, FHS & CHS
*     Engineering – Project Lead the Way, OHS & FHS
*     Environmental Science, CHS

*     Exercise Science, CHS
*     Fire Science, FHS
*     Information Technology, FHS
*     Information Technology and Software Engineering, CHS
*     Interactive Media, FHS
*     Marketing Education, FHS & CHS
*     Mass Communication-Print/Broadcast Journalism, CHS
*     Technical Theater, CHS
*     Sports Marketing (semester course at FHS, may be taken concurrently with Marketing at FHS)
*     Introduction to Programming (semester course; recommended to be taken sophomore year in preparation for the Information Technology program junior and senior years at FHS)

CHS=Centerville High School
FHS=Fairmont High School
OHS=Oakwood High School

Course Descriptions

English

The purpose of English is to educate the student in clear, precise oral and written expression, to develop the power of discrimination in reading, and to inculcate an expression and a love for the best in literature. Four years of high school English are required for all students.  Also required of all students is the satisfactory completion of a research paper portfolio during their junior year. The courses in English focus on studying fiction and nonfiction, memorizing passages, crafting compositions and term papers, facilitating discussions, and building grammar, vocabulary, spelling and punctuation skills.

Students will take two of Ohio’s State Tests in English. The first test will be near the conclusion of English I or English I H, and the second will be near the conclusion of English II, English II H, or English II HH. If a student is pursuing coursework slightly different from this, testing will be near the conclusion of the closest corresponding course.

World Languages

The primary goal of World Language studies is to equip students with the ability to communicate in a second, or even third, language. World Language study also strives to give students the skills they need to become global citizens by stimulating an interest in travel and international affairs and by developing a better understanding of cultural difference.  Students will gain the skills necessary to succeed in college and/or pursue an international career.  The offerings in World Languages are varied enough to suit student interests and needs at the high school level.  The courses offer sound training in the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The study of a language for at least three years is recommended.

English I

This course focuses on literature and grammar. The literature includes novels, a play, poetry and compositions for each nine-week period. Course readings may include Hamilton’s Mythology, The Odyssey, Julius Caesar, Of Mice and Men, Animal Farm and The Book Thief. Grammar consists of a review of fundamentals along with concentration on vocabulary and composition. This is a required course in the ninth grade.  
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English IH

English I Honors is a comprehensive investigation of Ancient Greek, Elizabethan, Victorian and Modern Literature. During the summer before freshman year, the students read and analyze Jane Eyre. Throughout the year, they study Mythology, The Odyssey, Trojan Women, Julius Caesar, Animal Farm, Of Mice and Men and The Book Thief; craft literary arguments, original short stories and poems; and hone their grammar and vocabulary skills. The course intends not only to prepare students for the honors and AP track, but also to enhance students’ college readiness.  Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in English 8H, or A in English 8.  Summer work is required and is assigned in May.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English II

English II examines world literature.  Students may read Oedipus Rex, Antigone, The Tempest, Lord of the Flies, and Siddhartha, in addition to other supplemental readings, including short stories, poetry and nonfiction works. Principles of grammar, style, research, and rhetoric will be introduced to enhance student writing and critical thinking.  Vocabulary development will be incorporated throughout the year. Assignments will include literary analysis, essays, student presentations, creative writing assignments and projects, and weekly student assessments. This is a required tenth grade course. Successful completion of English I is a prerequisite for this course.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English II H

English II Honors provides an advanced study of world literature. Students will further develop their critical reading skills, their writing skills, and their critical thinking skills through their study of several major works of literature, including novels, plays, poetry, and works of nonfiction. Possible titles include The Oedipus Cycle, Things Fall Apart, Lord of the Flies, and short story and poetry selections. Students will write in several different modes, including critical, creative, persuasive, and reflective. Students will complete several presentation projects related to their study of literature. Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in English I H, or A in English I.  Summer work is required and is assigned in May.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English II HH

English II High Honors is a sophomore course for students preparing for the Advanced Placement program their junior and senior years. Designed as a study of world literature, students will survey a broad scope of world writers and poets including Hesse, Sartre, Achebe, Hurston, Solzhenistyn and others.  They will complete an extensive summer reading project that will culminate in a student-led, interpretative seminar and exhibition, and a writing portfolio including literary analysis, essays and creative and narrative responses. Critical interpretation of literature, rhetorical and research strategies, and elements of style will be addressed to enhance student writing.  Students will use grammar, vocabulary, and sentence construction and combining strategies to enhance their writing. Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in English I H, or A in English I. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English III

This junior year course is a study of American literature. Works from the selected list may include Streetcar Named Desire, The Great Gatsby, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Catcher In The Rye, and The House on Mango Street, anthologized selections from authors of critical periods of American literature, a Shakespeare selection, and a nonfiction book of the student’s choice.  Emphasis is given to preparation for college and the writing process.  Assignments may include writing process work, précis writing, response to literature essays, and rhetorical process compositions. Grammar instruction and vocabulary development are continued. One major component of this class is the extended research portfolio. Students will develop the skills necessary to complete a nonfiction-based research project, focusing on their abilities to successfully use original sources, Internet sources, critical works, periodicals, and scholarly journals.  They will then compose a two-thousand-word research paper that must meet established criteria. This is a required course in the eleventh grade. The satisfactory completion of the research paper portfolio during this class is required to graduate.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English III H

English III Honors is an enrichment section that offers a detailed study of the impressions of American Literature and American studies.  Several critical essays and précis are assigned for each work studied.  Exposition, analysis and research of critical essays are often applied to the literature of IIIH.  Possible works from the recommended studies list are The Great Gatsby, Catcher in the Rye, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The House on Mango Street, and a Shakespeare selection. A text and continued grammar and vocabulary study are vital parts of the class.  A brief summer reading list is required of students in honors English. One major component of this class is the extended research portfolio.  Students will develop the skills necessary to complete a nonfiction-based research project, focusing on students’ abilities to successfully use original sources, Internet sources, critical works, periodicals, and scholarly journals.  They will then compose a two-thousand-word research paper that must meet established criteria.  Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in English II H, or A in English II.  The satisfactory completion of the research paper portfolio during this class is required to graduate. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1                    LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP English III Language and Composition

AP English III is a junior year course that culminates with participation in the Advanced Placement Language and Composition exam for college credit and/or placement.  English IIIAP provides a dual approach through the study of literature and rhetoric for the student’s junior year. Several novels, assigned over the summer, form the foundation for the literature seminars during the year.  Along with many genres of literature, the AP III student concentrates on rhetorical studies as a matter of approaching and producing composition. Critical interpretation of literature and rhetoric prepare the student for the AP Language and Composition exam. The course includes a three-thousand-word non-fiction research paper and bi-weekly compositions. A forward interest in literary studies and an ability to approach ideas critically on paper and in discussion is a requirement. Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in English II HH, or A in English II H.  The satisfactory completion of the research paper portfolio during this class is required to graduate. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English IV

The first semester of English IV includes a survey of the greatest English writings of historical and literary British periods.  Students study British drama, poetry and novels. Works may include Beowulf, Canterbury Tales, a Shakespeare selection, Frankenstein, and various short stories.  Various texts and other works are used to explore other genres and writing periods.  The second semester includes varying seminars dealing with specific, intensive study of selected genres and time periods.  The focus of second semester involves delving deeply into content, reading critically, and developing writing. Expository writing and précis are an essential part of the course as is continued grammar instruction and review. Time is dedicated to various approaches to rhetoric and structural stylistics, and a researched project is required to pass the course. This is a required twelfth grade course. Successful completion of English III is a prerequisite for this course.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

English IV H/CCP Great Books Literature

As the culminating course of the Honors English program, English IV Honors continues to focus on building and enhancing writing, reading, speaking, and thinking skills that have been developed in the previous years.  By practicing various writing techniques, students will continue to develop the tools to write expository and persuasive pieces. Composition instruction will emphasize, among others, literary analysis, summary, essay form, and revision. Students will explore, analyze, and discuss various pieces of British literature, including fiction, plays, poetry, essay, and nonfiction.  Students will actively participate in class discussion, and prepare and present several oral presentations related to the readings. Students will also work with new vocabulary, review grammar, and hone college writing skills. First semester will focus on a survey of British literature; second semester’s focus aligns with the thematic nature of Wright State University’s English 2040 course. During the second semester, students’ writing will be evaluated by both the high school instructor and a WSU college professor. Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in English III H, or A in English III.  Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Wright State University. For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT: 1 or 1.5 CCP                  LENGTH: FULL YEAR

 

AP English IV Literature and Composition

Audited and approved by the College Board, this course is the culmination of a three-year program for highly motivated and industrious students with high achievement in English. Participation in this program depends on the selection criteria for AP and Honors courses. Students who enroll in the course are expected to take the AP Lit and Comp test in the spring, which may earn credit in college. The first semester is concerned with summer reading seminars, literary terminology, literary philosophies, and criticism. The second semester includes British survey (Old English) and carries through the Modern Age. The grammar is a review course, and the composition instruction is based on the structural revision of style. Students are expected to anticipate writing at least one major assignment (5-15 pages) per quarter. Extensive reading and journaling are required.  Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in AP English III, or A in English III H.  Summer work is required and is assigned in May.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

 

Yearbook

The primary purpose of this course is the publication of the school yearbook, Acorn.  One of the main goals of the class is to create an accurate, representative record of the school year.  To do so, the course consists of the study and practice of the essentials of publication: layout and design, writing, photography basics, desktop publishing, and advertising.  Student responsibilities include meeting assigned deadlines, selling advertising, and possessing basic computer skills. Acorn needs responsible people with ambition, curiosity and independence.  This course is open to students in grades 9 through 12. Students must complete an interview and recommendation form (available in the spring) to be considered for the staff.  Summer fundraising is required.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Newspaper

Students learn the basics of journalism.  They also become proficient in using InDesign and PhotoShop. Student work could be published in The Dome.  This class is open to students in grades 9 through 12. Interested students must apply by personal interview and application the preceding spring.  Summer fundraising is required.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Academic Decathlon

Academic Decathlon is a course in which students engage in interdisciplinary study of a topic and prepare for competition in the areas of art, economics, essay, interview, language and literature, mathematics, music, science, social science, and speech.  The course provides students an opportunity to experience the challenges of rigorous curriculum through team competition. The program is designed to include students of three academic levels - "A", "B", and "C". Many colleges and universities award Academic Decathlon participants favorable status in the admissions process.
CREDIT: 1, LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Public Speaking

If you have experienced sweaty palms and a queasy stomach at the very thought of giving a speech, you are part of a majority.  Learn to conquer those fears and become a poised, confident and effective communicator. This course in public speaking will provide practice in a variety of public speaking situations and will introduce students to competitive speaking.  This course is open to students in grades 9 through 12.
CREDIT: .5, LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Dramatics

This class is open to students in grades 9 through 12 and is designed to teach students fundamentals of stagecraft and the art of dramatic expression.  Study in the areas of theater history, dramatic literature and criticism, and study and practice in the arts of voice and diction, body language, pantomime, interpretation, and acting are a part of the class.  
CREDIT: .5, LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

French I

French I is an introduction to reading, writing, speaking, and listening in French.  Students learn from a variety of materials, including texts, DVDs, CDs, and authentic materials. These materials will expose students to using French in everyday situations, as well as teach correct structure and usage.  Students also learn about France and the Francophone world in order to introduce them to French civilization. It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

French II

French II continues the process of practicing and building upon the four basic language skills. As in French I, students continue to study French and Francophone civilization and culture. Students continue to learn from texts, DVDs, CDs, and authentic material. These materials will expose students to using French in everyday situations, as well as teach correct structure and usage.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

French II H

French II Honors is designed for the student who excels in French and plans to continue their study of the French language & culture through the AP level or their graduation from OHS.  This fast-paced course is for the motivated language learner and will continue to build the four language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking along with the study of French and Francophone civilization and culture.  Texts, DVDs, CDs, and authentic material in the target language will immerse the French II Honors student in French. Students wishing to enter French II H must fulfill the following requirements:  1) maintain an “A” average in French I, and, 2) be recommended by their French teacher.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

French III

In this intermediate French course, students will learn new structural elements to strengthen language proficiency.  They will continue to increase their vocabulary for oral and written communication. In addition, students will expand their knowledge and appreciation for French culture and the Francophone world.  DVDs, CDs, authentic materials and texts provide students with materials to learn language in everyday situations. It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

French III H

French III Honors is a challenging intermediate course designed for the student who excels in French and plans to continue their study of the French language & culture in preparation for the AP or college placement tests.  Students will learn new structural elements to strengthen language proficiency while increasing their vocabulary for ease of oral and written communication. Students will actively study the French and Francophone worlds through a variety of real life activities and projects to gain a knowledge and appreciation of culture.  Authentic materials & texts, DVDs and CDs will provide students with a variety of thematic learning opportunities. Students wishing to enter French III H must fulfill the following requirements: 1) maintain an “A” average during all quarters of French II, and 2) be recommended by their French teacher.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

French IV

The goal of this total immersion course is to increase student proficiency in the four fundamental areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as an understanding of cultural trends. Students will build thematic vocabulary and strengthen grammar skills while practicing listening comprehension and speaking.  By reading their first French novel, St. Exupéry’s Le Petit Prince, students improve their comprehension of sentence structure, vocabulary and grammar while discussing the philosophical and historical aspects of the book.  Students are required to purchase the novel. This course is designed to prepare students for the French V AP program. It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP French V: Language and Culture

This total immersion course continues the format described in French IV with an added emphasis on preparation for the AP and college placement exams.   Improving communication in the target language will be stressed. The use of authentic materials from film and literature will help students understand French culture while refining the language skills of reading, writing, listening & speaking.  Students taking the course for AP credit should expect intense preparation for the AP exam. Students may be required to purchase one workbook.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Spanish I

Spanish I is an introduction to reading, writing, speaking, and listening in Spanish.  Students learn from a variety of materials, including texts, DVDs, CDs, and authentic materials. These materials will expose students to using Spanish in everyday situations, as well as teach correct structure and usage.  Students also learn about the Hispanic world in order to introduce them to culture and civilization.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Spanish II

Spanish II continues the process of practicing and building upon the four basic language skills. As in Spanish I, students continue to study Hispanic culture and civilization. Students continue to learn from texts, DVDs, CDs, and authentic material. These materials will expose students to using Spanish in everyday situations, as well as teach correct structure and usage.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Spanish II H

Spanish II Honors is designed for the student who excels in Spanish and plans to continue their study of the Spanish language & culture through the AP level or their graduation from OHS. This fast-paced course is for the motivated language learner and continues the study of the language stressing reading, writing, listening and speaking. As in Spanish I, cultural information is an integral part of each lesson.  CD’s, videos, computer programs and authentic materials will immerse the Spanish II H student in Spanish. Students wishing to enter Spanish II H must fulfill the following requirements: 1) maintain an “A” average in Spanish I, and 2) be recommended by their Spanish teacher. It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study. 

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Spanish III

Spanish III is a challenging intermediate class that bridges the introductory level classes to the advanced classes. Grammar, verbs, and writing skills are developed through varied assignments, while listening and speaking skills are enhanced through class discussions, conversations and oral presentations. Authentic materials are integrated into the lessons in order to strengthen the learning experience.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Spanish III H

Spanish III Honors is a challenging intermediate class designed for the student who excels in Spanish and plans to continue their study of the Spanish language & culture in preparation for the AP or college placement tests.  Advanced grammar, verbs, vocabulary and writing skills are developed through varied assignments, while listening and speaking skills are enhanced through class discussions, conversations and oral presentations. The use of authentic materials will help students gain cultural knowledge.  CD’s, videos and computer programs are used as supplemental materials. Students wishing to enter Spanish III H must fulfill the following requirements: 1) maintain an “A” average during all quarters of Spanish II, and 2) be recommended by their Spanish teacher.  It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Spanish IV

Synthesis and integration are objectives of this advanced Spanish class. A thematic vocabulary approach combined with grammatical overview provides the framework for the student to incorporate all aspects of the language, speaking, listening, reading and writing.  Speeches, compositions, movies, selected literary works and other authentic materials support the objectives of this challenging Spanish course. Preliminary AP exam preparation is initiated at this level. It is recommended that a student maintain at least a “C” average in order to continue to the next level of study.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP Spanish V: Language and Culture

Students in Spanish V AP continue to concentrate on refining all language skills, reading, speaking, writing, and listening, stressing synthesis and integration of Spanish.  A continuation of thematic vocabulary and grammatical review are interwoven with authentic literary works and listening activities including movies, YouTube and other Internet resources.  Intense AP exam and summer assignments are vital components of this advanced course. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

CCP Beginning American Sign Language I

This course provides a foundation for non-signers to study American Sign Language (ASL) and learn about deaf culture.  It includes principles, methods and techniques for communicating with deaf individuals who sign. Focusing on development of receptive and expressive sign skills, manual alphabet, numbers, sign vocabulary, syntax, grammar and culture.  

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Sinclair Community

College. For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT: 1.0 CCP LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

CCP Beginning American Sign Language II

Continue to study American Sign Language (ASL) grammatical structure, vocabulary, fingerspelling, use of signing space, conversational regulators and introductory aspects of deaf culture.  Prerequisite: CCP Beginning American Sign Language I.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Sinclair Community

College. For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT: 1.0 CCP  LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Mathematics

The Ohio CORE requires that all Ohio students pass four years of mathematics including Algebra II or its equivalent. 

The mathematics curriculum consists of those courses, activities and units of instruction designed to contribute to the common specialized needs of secondary school students.  Knowing that the abilities and interests of students vary, the Mathematics Department offers a variety of courses to meet the individual needs of all students.  Graphing calculators and computer software are used to facilitate the students’ understanding of mathematical concepts. Our mathematics courses prepare students for success in college, in careers, and in daily life in contemporary society.  Each course shares the following mathematical and instructional features:  multiple connected mathematical strands, mathematical modeling, access for a wide range of students, technology use and active learning.  

For all math courses, students are required to have a graphing calculator, and the TI-83 Plus or TI-84 Plus or TI-nspire is recommended. 

Science

Science graduation requirements are 3 years of science with the following emphasis:  1 physical science credit, 1 life science credit, and 1 credit in an advanced science.  To earn the “Academic Honors Diploma”, students must earn four units of science, including physics and chemistry.

The science program follows the pattern traditionally offered by college preparatory high schools.  The department recognizes that the abilities and interests of students vary.  Therefore, the Science Department offers a variety of courses to meet the individual needs of all students.  The attitudes of various scientific methods are reinforced by classroom discussion and laboratory experiments presented as a process of inquiry and a mode of thinking.  Students will be engaged in asking valid scientific questions and gathering and analyzing information to help them better understand the world in which they live and interact in.  Students wishing to pursue online science credit will need prior approval by the science department chair and principal.  

Students will take one of Ohio’s State Tests in Science. The test will be near the conclusion of Biology or Biology in Society. If a student is pursuing coursework slightly different from this, testing will be near the conclusion of the closest corresponding course.

 

Algebra I

Algebra I is designed for freshmen and emphasizes various ways that patterns and real world phenomena can be described.  This includes graphical, numerical, and symbolic representations. Students will use equations, inequalities and functions to represent observed patterns. They will solve equations and inequalities using multiple representations, will produce and examine graphs, and will study the real number system. This class will include the following topics: (1) operations with real numbers, (2) linear equations and inequalities, (3) relations & functions, (4) polynomials, (5) data analysis, and (6) nonlinear equations. A graphing calculator is required.
CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER, 
LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

Geometry H

An honors math course may follow the same or similar general topics as a non-honors math course of the same title, but the course is a different course due to the pace, sequence and depth of contents. Honors math courses proceed at a swifter pace and expect a greater depth of understanding. Geometry Honors provides students with experiences that deepen their understanding of two and three-dimensional objects and their properties. Deductive and inductive reasoning as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions are stressed. Properties and relationships of geometric objects include the study of: (1) points, lines, angles and planes; (2) polygons, with a special focus on quadrilaterals, triangles, right triangles including trigonometry; (3) circles; and (4) polyhedra and other solids. An understanding of proof and logic is mastered.  Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (A or B) of Algebra I H.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER, LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

Geometry

Geometry provides students with experiences that deepen their understanding of two and three-dimensional objects and their properties. Deductive and inductive reasoning as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions are stressed. Properties and relationships of geometric objects include the study of: (1) points, lines, angles and planes; (2) polygons, with special focus on quadrilaterals, triangles, right triangles; (3) circles; and (4) polyhedra and other solids. An understanding of proof and logic is developed. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra I.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER, LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

Algebra II H

An honors math course may follow the same or similar general topics as a non-honors math course of the same title, but the course is a different course due to the pace, sequence and depth of contents. Honors math courses proceed at a swifter pace and expect a greater depth of understanding. Algebra II Honors is a course that expands on the topics of Algebra I and provides further development of the concept of a function. Topics include: (1) relations, functions, equations and inequalities; (2) conic sections; (3) polynomials; (4) data analysis; (5) logarithmic and exponential functions; (6) sequences and series; (7) counting principles and probability; and (8) trigonometry. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (A or B) of Geometry H.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER, LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

Algebra II

Algebra II is a course that expands on the topics of Algebra I and provides further development of the concept of a function. Topics include: (1) relations, functions, equations and inequalities; (2) conic sections; (3) polynomials; (4) data analysis; (5) logarithmic and exponential functions; (6) sequences and series; (7) counting principles and probability; and (8) trigonometry. Students are required to have a graphing calculator.  Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Geometry.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER, LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

Pre-Calculus H

An honors math course may follow the same or similar general topics as a non-honors math course of the same title, but the course is a different course due to the pace, sequence and depth of contents. Honors math courses proceed at a swifter pace and expect a greater depth of understanding. Pre-Calculus Honors is a continuation of Algebra II Honors.  Content is treated in greater depth than the regular course and at an accelerated pace. Additional topics covered include sequences and series, matrices and limits. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Prerequisite:  Satisfactory completion (A or B) of Algebra II H or Math III H.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER    LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

 

Pre-calculus

This course has a strong emphasis on functions, their properties, and their uses in solving problems.  In this course, students will look at various "families" of functions, including polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions.  Various properties and operations on functions will be examined, including even and odd functions, composition and inverses of functions, and transformations of functions.  Students are required to have a graphing calculator. Prerequisite:  Satisfactory completion of Geometry and Algebra II.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER    LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

CCP Business Calculus

This course is a yearlong math course that includes topics from both calculus and finite math.  The major topics from calculus include: limits and continuity, derivatives of polynomial, composite, inverse, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions, techniques of differentiation, and area under functions, antiderivatives, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and techniques of integration. Students are required to have a graphing calculator.  This course may be taken concurrently with AP Statistics, but not with AP Calculus. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus H.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Sinclair Community College. For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT: 1 or 1.5 CCP          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP Calculus (AB Syllabus)

This course includes the calculus and analytical geometry content of the AB Calculus examination of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Program.  Major topics include polynomial, circular, composite, inverse, logarithmic, and exponential functions; derivatives and differentials and their applications; continuity and limits; techniques and applications of integration.  The course emphasizes understanding of basic concepts of calculus. Students are expected to take the AP Examination for Calculus AB at the completion of the course. Their success on this test may earn them advanced placement or college credit in mathematics.  Students are required to have a graphing calculator. The TI-83 Plus, TI-84 Plus, or TI-89 are recommended. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (A or B) of Pre-Calculus H or departmental recommendation.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP Calculus (BC Syllabus)

This course includes the calculus and analytical geometry content of the BC Calculus examination of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Program.  Calculus BC is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It includes all topics covered in Calculus AB plus additional topics, including parametric, polar, and vector functions, applications of integrals, and polynomial approximations and series.  Students are expected to take the AP Examination for Calculus BC at the completion of the course. Their success on this test may earn them advanced placement or college credit in mathematics. Students are required to have a graphing calculator. The TI-83 Plus, TI-84 Plus, or TI-89 are recommended.  Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion (A or B) of Pre-Calculus H or departmental recommendation.  If a student has previously received the AP add-on for Calculus AB, the AP add-on for BC will be for the second semester only of Calculus BC.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP Statistics

This course includes the content of the statistics examination of the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Program.  Major topics include: measures of center and spread, correlation, regression, normal distribution, central limit theorem, experimental design, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and comparison of means.  Students are required to have a graphing calculator; the TI-83 Plus or TI-84 Plus are the recommended choices. Students are expected to take the AP Examination at the completion of the course. Success on this test may earn the student college credit in mathematics.  Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra II, Algebra II H, or Math III H or departmental recommendation, to be taken following or concurrently with Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus H.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Transition to College Mathematics

This course will build upon Algebra and Geometry and is designed for seniors (not enrolled in Pre-Calculus). The course employs algebra, pre-calculus, probability and statistics, calculus and geometry to career planning, financial management, income analysis, budgeting techniques, savings and investment strategies, evaluation of services offered by financial institutions, managing credit cards and debt, risk analysis, fraud and financial loss, Field projects, computer spreadsheets, and graphing calculators are key components of the course.  This class will include the following topics: Functions (Graphing, Evaluating, Regression of Linear, Exponential, Cubic, and Piecewise), Exponent Rules, Circles (Arc length, Sectors, Central Angles), and, Finance, Probability, Systems of Equations. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra II or departmental recommendation.
CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER, LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

Physical Science

Physical Science introduces students to key concepts and theories that provide a foundation for further study in the sciences and advanced science disciplines. Physical Science comprises the systematic study of the physical world as it relates to fundamental concepts about matter, energy and motion. This course focuses the student in studies within the branches of chemistry, physics, and astronomy, utilizing historical perspectives and mathematical reasoning. An inquiry approach will be utilized to help students explore and create understanding of the concepts and scientific process explored throughout the course.  This course is required of all freshmen except those taking Biology.   This course meets the physical science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: .5 EACH SEMESTER    LENGTH: 2 SEMESTERS

 

Biology

This course offers an introduction to the science of life and its interactions.  The course of study includes the central themes of cell biology, biochemistry, genetics, modern taxonomy, comparative anatomy, physiology, evolution and ecology.  Laboratory participation is a major component of this course with an emphasis on the development of the student’s analytical skills in the acquisition and evaluation of both quantitative and qualitative experimental data.  Students engage in investigations to understand and explain the behavior of living things in a variety of scenarios that incorporate scientific reasoning, analysis, communication skills, and real-world applications. Biology is traditionally a sophomore course.  It is recommended that freshmen seeking admission to Biology have an “A” in their eighth grade science course.  This course meets the life science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Biology in Society

This biology class is designed for those who are seeking completion of the science graduation requirement, but who are not seeking extensive college science preparation. This activity-oriented lab class will use the inquiry approach to learning science and will focus on the major conceptual framework of science using the life sciences as a vehicle for study. Writing, problem solving, research, and laboratory skills will be emphasized.  This biology course is open to students in grades 10 through 12 who have not previously completed a biology, chemistry or physics course. This course meets the life science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

 

Chemistry

Chemistry is a college preparatory course designed for the serious student of science. Chemistry is the science dealing with the structure, change and composition of matter. The course of study involves the following areas: atomic structure and electron configuration, chemical bonding, change of phases, ionization and equilibrium, solutions and suspensions, organic compounds, and nuclear chemistry. This course is designed to establish a firm foundation for students preparing to enter the technical fields related to the physical sciences. A direct objective is to promote an atmosphere of scientific inquiry through the application of the scientific method.  This course meets the physical science graduation requirement or advanced science graduation requirement for students that have taken Physical Science.  

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Physics

Physics is the fundamental science of the natural world.  In this course students will study the topics of kinematics, dynamics, waves, sound, light and electricity. The basic concepts and fundamental principles introduced in the course serve as a foundation for advanced work in this or any other physical science. Laboratory experiments serve to illustrate the fundamentals more clearly and to acquaint the student with the use of equipment and technology. Since there is a close correlation between physics and mathematics, it is recommended that the students possess a solid preparation in Geometry Honors or Geometry.  This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Astronomy

In this one semester course the student will gain an understanding of the basic structure of the Universe, the methods astronomers use for probing the Universe, and the physical processes that govern the behavior and development of astronomical systems.  Topics will include celestial mechanics and moon phases, telescope principles and operation, properties of light, atomic absorption and emission, the interstellar medium, stellar structure and evolution, compact objects (including black holes), galaxies, and cosmology.  Students will learn to find constellations and planets in the night sky through occasional nighttime sessions. There will be a laboratory component to the course and occasional evening stargazing sessions. Prerequisites:  A physical science credit and junior or senior standing.  This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Forensic Science I

Forensic Science I focuses on the collection, identification and analysis of crime scene evidence.  Emphasis will be placed on the methods that link the suspect, victim, and crime scene. Major topics of study include entomology, fingerprinting, hair and fiber examination, blood spatter analysis, and crime scene investigation.  Case studies and current events will also be explored. Prerequisites:  Both a physical science and a life science credit and junior or senior standing. This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Forensic Science II

Forensic Science II is a lab-based course that will explore advanced forensic science topics, which build upon the basic techniques learned in Forensic Science I.  Major topics of study include forensic anthropology, pathology, toxicology, odontology, handwriting analysis, glass and soil analysis, and ballistics. A variety of guest speakers will help to provide students with real world experience.  Prerequisites: Forensic Science I and junior or senior standing.  An end of year grade in Forensic Science I of “C” or above is highly suggested. This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

(only offered second semester)

Environmental Science

Environmental Science incorporates concepts from biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and physical geology to introduce students to issues and concerns facing our world.  Inquiry investigations and fieldwork will be utilized to help students gain an understanding about how humans are impacting the planet and to design scenarios that incorporate scientific reasoning, analysis, communication skills, and real-world applications to improve environmental conditions of our planet.  Prerequisites:  Both a physical science and a life science credit and junior or senior standing.  This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

AP Biology

AP Biology is a second-year course, offering an advanced, extensive study into a number of topics first introduced in Biology I.  Students apply the process of scientific inquiry to cover a full-year introductory college course in biology with laboratory. The areas of study include: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, biotechnology, evolution, taxonomy, plant systems, animal systems, and ecology.  The course has a strong lab emphasis as well as a detailed writing and problem solving emphasis. All class activities, laboratories, and textbooks are college level. Laboratory work is more complex than the typical introductory laboratory school course. The instructor may require lab periods that would meet up to twice a week before school or at lunch (7:25-8:10 a.m. or 11:40-12:40 p.m.).  Students will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring that may earn them advanced placement in college and/or college credit. It is recommended that the student has successfully completed Algebra II before enrolling in AP Biology. Prerequisites:  End of year grade “B” or above in Biology and Chemistry.  This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.  Summer work is required and is assigned in July.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP Chemistry

AP Chemistry is a second-year course offering more extensive study in the following areas: the structure and states of matter, stoichiometry, kinetics and thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, oxidation-reduction reactions, and descriptive chemistry.  This course will be lab and problem solving based. There will be a strong emphasis on laboratory procedure, analysis and presentation of results as part of the AP course validation.  The instructor may require lab periods that would meet up to twice a week before school (7:25 - 8:10 a.m.).  Students will take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring that may earn them advanced placement in college and/or college credit.  Prerequisite:  End of year grade “B” or above in Chemistry.  This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP Physics C

AP Physics C is a calculus-based physics course meant to correspond to a full-year college physics course covering Newtonian mechanics and electricity & magnetism, usually intended for students pursuing a degree in engineering or the physical sciences.  Students in this course will develop skills in mathematical and experimental analysis of physical systems.

Up to twice a week students will engage in extended laboratory time, requiring class time extending beyond the regular school day, scheduled either before school or during lunch.

The end of course AP test is actually two tests, one covering Newtonian mechanics and one covering electricity and magnetism; therefore the College Board test fee is double for this course.  Participation in these tests is an expected part of the course. Prerequisite: Physics and recommendation from Physics instructor.  Corequisite: AP Calculus (AB or BC). Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

CCP Human Anatomy and Physiology

This senior science course is specifically designed for those twelfth grade students who have followed the accelerated high school science sequence of Biology, Chemistry and Physics.  The yearlong course offers a comprehensive review of human anatomy and physiology, selected pathologies, histology, gerontology and oncology. There is an especially strong emphasis on technical and research procedures in the lab as well as the ability to critically evaluate scientific literature. Biology and Chemistry are prerequisites for the course.   This course meets the advanced science graduation requirement.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Sinclair Community College. For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT: 1 or 2.0 CCP          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Engineering

The Engineering program is modeled after the Pathway to Engineering curriculum developed by Project Lead the Way (PLtW), a national leader in STEM education.  It is a sequence of courses that build upon each other to give students a broad introduction to the fields of engineering.  The majority of instruction within each course is project-based learning where students apply concepts and principles they are studying in math and science to the design process.  Students can earn college credit through Project Lead the Way. 

Social Studies

Four years of social studies are required for all students. Each course in the social studies program integrates the disciplines of history, the social sciences and the humanities.  The overall goal of the social studies program is to provide the tools for all students to gain a realistic knowledge of themselves as individuals, and their proper relationship to a broader community, culture or society.  Through the study of social studies, students will gain the skills and values necessary to apply that knowledge to become contributing citizens of their local, national and global communities.

Students will take two of Ohio’s State Tests in Social Studies. The first test will be near the conclusion of American History or AP American History, and the second will be near the conclusion of Civics: American Government/Economics or AP American Government and Politics. If a student is pursuing coursework slightly different from this, testing will be near the conclusion of the closest corresponding course.

One of the following World History courses (1200 level) will fulfill the required freshmen social studies credit.

Introduction to Engineering

This is the introductory course in our engineering program. The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards and technical documentation. Students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems and learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. This course is open to 9-12 grade students.

CREDIT: 1              LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Principles of Engineering

This is the second year course in our engineering program.  This survey course of engineering exposes students to major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, documenting their work and communicating solutions to peers and members of the professional community.  This course can be used to fulfill an advanced science credit. Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in Introduction to Engineering Design or instructor approval.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Biotechnical Engineering

This is an elective course within our engineering program.  The major focus of this course is to expose students to the diverse fields of biotechnology including biomedical engineering, biochemical engineering, agricultural engineering and environmental engineering. Students will be engaged in a wide range of engineering problems applying chemical and biological principles to design materials and processes that directly measure, repair, improve and cultivate living systems. Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry or currently taking Chemistry. This class is offered to 10-12 grade students and counts as an advanced science credit.  It will only be offered in even numbered years (2018-19, 2020-21, etc.)

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Civil Engineering and Architecture

Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. Prerequisite: End of year grade of B or higher in Introduction to Engineering Design along with approval from the IED instructor. This class is offered to 10-12 grade students and counts as an elective credit.  It will only be offered in odd numbered years (2019-20, 2021-22, etc.) Therefore, this course will NOT be offered in 2018-19.  

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

 

Modern World Studies

This course is designed to provide a thorough study of global affairs from the Enlightenment to the present.  The history, geography, and cultures of our modern global society will be combined with a comparative study of modern political and economic systems.  Students will gain an understanding of the distinctive and shared features of the world’s peoples. The role of the United States in a world of increasingly global interdependence, and the duties of responsible citizenship will also be featured.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP World History

Students will become familiar with major themes and developments in world history from early history to the present. Students will be given the equivalent of an introductory college-level course in world history.  This course is designed to be an introductory experience for the College Board’s Advanced Placement classes. Students who take this course will take the AP exam in May. This course will emphasize a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts through interaction with different types of human societies. AP World History emphasizes relevant factual knowledge used in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. AP World History highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage. A basic assumption is that the students in the AP World History course will have the ability and motivation to master basic factual information and do extensive reading and writing.  Incoming freshmen must have earned an “A” in their 8th grade social studies class and a minimum proficiency score on the AP screening test. Summer work is required and will be assigned in May.  This course is offered to freshmen only during the 2018-2019 school year.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Modern American History

This course will provide students with a comprehensive study of America’s history from 1877 to the present.  It will review the political, economic, social, cultural, and geographic features of our nation and their relevance to our nation’s development.  Students will be expected to relate past events and political decisions to current national affairs. This course meets the American History requirement and is offered to students in grade 10.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP US History

The AP United States History course is designed to give students an intensive study of United States History at a level somewhat higher than that of a college freshman survey course. It is intended to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam that may qualify a student for college credit and/or exemption from certain college courses. The students will develop analytic skills and knowledge of the factual aspects of United States History with the goal of arriving at informed interpretations or conclusions. A considerable amount of reading and essay work is required of the students. Students are selected on the basis of the Advanced Placement criteria. This course meets the American History requirement and is offered to students in grade 10.  Recommended Prerequisite: Advanced Placement history courses are reading and writing intensive and include a summer research project.  It is highly suggested that students register for the course only if they have achieved an A or B average in previous English and history courses. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

CCP Western Civilizations to 1500

Examination of the character of the pre-modern world from prehistory through the 15th century with special attention to those aspects of ancient and medieval life that had the greatest effect on the development of Western society, politics, and culture.  The course is open to juniors and seniors.  It is highly suggested that students register for the course only if they have achieved an A or B average in previous English and history courses or those who have been approved through Wright State University.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Wright State University. To enroll and remain in the course, students must meet WSU requirements and established deadlines for enrollment in CCP. For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT:   .5 or 1.0 CCP       LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

 

CCP The West and the World Since 1500

Examination of the modern Western world emphasizing the revolutions in economics, politics, religion and other phenomena that have shaped the Western world in our own time. The course is open to juniors and seniors.  It is highly suggested that students register for the course only if they have achieved an A or B average in previous English and history courses or those who have been approved through Wright State University.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Wright State University. To enroll and remain in the course, students must meet WSU requirements and established deadlines for enrollment in CCP.  For information on applying for this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT:    .5 or 1.0 CCP  LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Age of Antiquity

This semester class presents the wonders of the ancient world. Students will explore the origins of man, early civilizations, the development of world religions, classical civilizations as well as the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Emphasis will be placed upon the historic, geographic, political and cultural contributions of this time period. The class is recommended for students in grade 11, but meets credit requirements for both 11th and 12th grade social studies elective.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

AP European History

The AP European History course is a full-year course of study in European history since 1450.  The course follows a chronological progression with emphasis on the intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history of Europe.  In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the AP European History course are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam. Successful completion of this examination may result in the student receiving college credit and/or exemption from certain college courses. This class is recommended for students in grade 11, but is open to 11th and 12th graders. It meets the requirements for a 11th or 12th grade social studies elective. Recommended Prerequisite: Advanced Placement history courses are reading and writing intensive and include a summer research project.  It is highly suggested that students register for the course only if they have achieved an A or B average in previous English and history courses. Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Psychology

This elective course is designed to give students a broad view of the field of psychology, its concepts, theories and career possibilities. Emphasis is placed on the application of psychology to individual behavior in the modern world. This course is recommended for students anticipating taking one or more psychology courses in college. Research is required.  The course is open to juniors and seniors.  It will only be offered in odd numbered years (2019-20, 2021-22, etc.) Therefore, this course will NOT be offered in 2018-19.  

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Special Note: Upon successful completion of psychology, the student may elect to continue independently in preparation for the advanced placement exam.  There will be no .05 add on for taking this exam.

 

Sociology

This elective course is the study of man as a social being. Students will examine the discipline of sociology, sociological research, culture, socialization, the nature of the group, stratification, social change, and the five major institutions (family, religion, education, economic and political). This course provides a good introduction to sociology for students anticipating taking social science courses in college. Research or outside study is required. The course is open to juniors and seniors. It will only be offered in even numbered years (2018-19, 2020-21, etc.)

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Comparative Religion

This elective course introduces students to a wide variety of religious, ethical, and ideological belief systems.  Students will gain first-hand knowledge of different faiths through direct experiences with guest speakers and personal visitations.  The broad range of spiritual and intellectual life will be explored. A research project is required. This course is open to juniors and seniors; however, it is recommended that this course be taken during the senior year.  

Civics: American Government and Economics

This is a survey course starting with the theories and principals of Democratic Constitutional Government, and continuing to the practical aspects of the American political process.  Particular emphasis is placed on the Bill of Rights and the responsibilities of citizenship. During the second semester, students will examine the allocation of resources; the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services; markets and trade at the national and international level; the impact of government on the economy; and the role of the individual in the economy.  This course is open to juniors and seniors and meets the graduation requirement.

CREDIT: 1                         LENGTH: FULL YEAR

AP US Government and Politics

The AP United States Government and Politics course is a full year class that will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires a familiarity with various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.  Topics to be covered include constitutional arrangements, policy-making institutions, public opinion and the media, political parties, interest groups, civil liberties and civil rights, and budget making. The course is open to juniors and seniors.  Recommended prerequisite: AP United States History and/or AP English.  Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

CCP International Politics

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the basic concepts and issues in the study of international politics.  The course is designed as a survey of international actors, their behavior and interactions. Different approaches to the study of international relations will be emphasized throughout the course.  Major themes will include conflict v. cooperation, wealth v. poverty, and current issues in international politics. The course is open to juniors and seniors.  It is highly suggested that students register for the course only if they have achieved an A or B average in previous English and history courses or those who have been approved through Wright State University.

This is a CCP course for which a student can earn both high school and college credit through Wright State University. To enroll and remain in the course, students must meet WSU requirements and established deadlines

for enrollment in CCP.  For information on applying for

 

this option, see p. 4, item C, under College Credit Plus.

CREDIT:   .5 or 1.0 CCP       LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

AP Comparative Government and Politics

The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics is designed to introduce students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings.  The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available governmental alternatives, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policymaking.  Students will compare the effectiveness of policy approaches to the day’s issues by examining how different countries solve similar problems. Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia.  By using these six countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete example. There are no prerequisites for this class.  The course is open to juniors and seniors.  This semester course does NOT count as the American Government requirement and can only earn .025 “add on” credit.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Business Education

Computer Science

Learn Your ABCD's in Accounting

Accounting is the language of business.  It is an essential aspect of every business institution and organization.  As future workers, small business owners, entrepreneurs, citizens, parents, and investors, students will plan, record, analyze and interpret financial information utilizing generally accepted accounting procedures and concepts to be better prepared to make decisions that will affect their own economic futures or those of their employers.  (ABCD’s: Accounting, Bookkeeping, Credits, and Debits)  Suggested for students in grades 11 and 12.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Business Basics

This course will introduce students to such concepts as economics, business structures and organizations, banking and personal finance, career interests, and entrepreneurship.  It will serve as a great precursor to the other business courses students may take in the future.  Suggested for students in grades 9 and 10.  

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Law and Your Life

How does law impact students at work, at home, and at school?  This course will help students become aware of their rights and responsibilities under the law so they can function as responsible citizens.  This course will introduce students to the study of law through a brief look at how law developed, the legal system in the United States, the functions of the federal and state court systems, and civil and criminal law.  The course will also cover the ethical implications of copyright, piracy, and the Internet. Suggested for students in grades 11 and 12.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Make it Matter with Marketing

Teenagers possess close to $220 billion in purchasing power.  Marketers are well aware of this and spending the majority of their budgets targeting that population of our world.  This marketing course is designed for students to develop an understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to the overwhelming customer-oriented world around them.  Students will leave the course as much more aware consumers in the marketplace. Suggested for students in grades 10, 11, and 12.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Wall Street 101

The number one reason a student drops out of college is not because it’s hard, it’s because they can’t afford to stay.  This quarter course will focus on the importance of saving early and investing wisely. A course designed to inform students how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future potential earnings.  Real world topics covered will include, money management, credit, saving, investing and insurance. Students will be participating in three (3) simulations, running for ten (10) weeks, concurrently with the curriculum:  The H&R Block Budget Challenge; The University of Dayton Davis Center Portfolio Development Competition; and the PHIL 101 Oakwood Schools Foundation Charity Challenge. Suggested for students in grades 11 and 12.  

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Web Communications I

This project-based course uses the basics of Adobe tools to create websites.  Students will build an interactive website using tools such as HTML5, Flash, Fireworks and DreamWeaver. Students develop entry-level skills needed to plan, design, build, and maintain effective communications by using different forms of digital media. Students taking both Web Communication 1 and 2 may be eligible to take web design certification testing.  (This is 1 of 2 courses; you will need both to take any certification exam). Parent's permission to use the Internet as well as publish student work is required for participation in this course. This course is open to students in grades 9 - 12.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Web Communications II

This is the second of two courses offered in Web Communication. In this class students will build upon the skills previously learned to create an interactive website using Adobe tools such as Flash, Fireworks and DreamWeaver.  The course will include design concepts and principles, as well as technical skills including creating forms and templates, using basic HTML tags, head content and CSS.  Juniors and seniors taking this class may be eligible to participate in a job shadowing or internship with a local web design company. At the end of this class, students may have the opportunity to take a web design certification test at an approved testing facility. (This is the 2nd of 2 courses. You will need both to take any certification exam.) Parent's permission to use the Internet as well as publish student work is required for participation in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed Web Communication 1 with a grade of C or higher. This course is open to students in grades 9 - 12.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Film and Video Production

In this course students will learn about writing and developing scripts and storyboards for video segments. Students will learn how to use video, sound and editing techniques through the software applications iMovie and Garageband. Students will create films such as public service announcements, documentaries, and music videos as well as learn the processes of preproduction, production and post-production. Parent's permission to use the Internet as well as publish student work is required for participation in this course.  This is a repeatable, build-upon course.  Suggested for students in grades 9 - 12.

CREDIT: .5                           LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Broadcast Journalism

This project-based course is responsible for the broadcast of the morning announcements and the production of a weekly show. This class will cover equipment use, writing for broadcast, sound and lighting, interview techniques, editing for production, advertising, and public speaking. Parent's permission to use the Internet as well as publish student work is required for participation in this course. This course is open to students in grades 9 – 12 through an interview process.  Summer fundraising is required.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Computer Science: Email Etiquette

This ONLINE ONLY email etiquette course will walk you through the email system.  This course will cover the gmail system including groups, contacts, filters, folders, etc.  You may know a lot about Gmail, but there is always something more you can learn. This course is open to students in grades 9 – 12 with the only requisite being that students must have permission to use the Internet. 

CREDIT: .25                          LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Computer Science: Cyber Security

Everyday we hear more and more about hackers attacking personal computers, businesses and government offices around the world. Cyber security has become one of the fastest growing career fields in the United States. In this course students will use STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Math) concepts to complete hands-on learning activities of cyber security principles that are relevant and applicable to everyday life. Students will work together on virtual operating systems in the position of newly hired IT professionals tasked with managing the network of a small company. They will be tasked with finding cyber security vulnerabilities within the images and hardening the system while maintaining critical services. Students learn the importance of cyber safety and how to protect their personal devices and information from outside threats. During this course we will work on hardware, software, networks, and security.  This course is open to students in grades 9 – 12 with the only requisite being that students must have permission to use the Internet. 

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Computer Science: Internet Safety

This ONLINE ONLY Internet Safety course includes the following topics:  online safety, how to keep information secure, how to share information appropriately, and how to protect yourself from cyberbullying.  This course is open to students in grades 9 – 12 with the only requisite being that students must have permission to use the Internet. 

CREDIT: .25                          LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

 

Computer Programming

In this course, students will be introduced to programming concepts using Python.  Other languages (e.g. BASIC and Processing) may be utilized for particular applications.  The intent is to provide students with coding skills that will translate into any language.  Students will be instructed on the legal and ethical use of technology. Programming concepts will include variable declarations, conditional statements, and looping structures.  Receiving data inputs and displaying outputs will be an integral part of each program. Students will learn effective coding practices: planning, commenting, debugging, and using indentation and subroutines.  Students will have the opportunity to apply their programming skills in one of several environments. These include, but are not limited to, the development of a game or a mobile application, and controlling microelectronics or robotics.  This course is open to students in grades 9 - 12. Prerequisite: Must complete Algebra I.

CREDIT: .5  LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Health and Physical Education

Enrichment

Physical Education I

This course stresses development of skills in a wide variety of individual, dual, and group activities.  Students will learn and practice responsible social behaviors in a physical activity setting. At the end of this course, students will be able to find ways to enjoy physical activity throughout their lifetime.  One-half credit in physical education is required for graduation. Students must take the equivalent of at least one-quarter credit of physical education during the regular school year.

CREDIT: .25                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Physical Education II

This course provides all students the opportunity to learn the benefits of physical fitness and gain an appreciation of obtaining and maintaining an active and healthy lifestyle.  One-half credit in physical education is required for graduation. Students must take the equivalent of at least one-quarter credit of physical education during the regular school year.  

CREDIT: .25       LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Elective Advanced Physical Education

Elective Advanced Physical Education will concentrate on activities that will shape the body, improve cardiovascular function, and increase body awareness.  Students will be expected to be part of a training program that is individualized to help them reach their fitness goals. Students will be participating in a variety of higher intensity physical activities.  The class will meet daily for a semester. Because of the effort required, it is recommended that student-athletes enroll in this class during their off season. This course is open to students who have met their physical education requirements for graduation.  The prerequisite for this course is successful completion of Physical Education I and Physical Education II.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Health Education

The course will emphasize the mental, social and emotional growth of the adolescent. Topics such as drug abuse, smoking, drinking, mental health, communicable diseases, first aid and CPR will be discussed. Students will be encouraged to involve themselves in their own health education. Health Education is a required course for freshmen students.

CREDIT: .5

Senior High Enrichment

This year-long course will require some face-to-face meetings and an online component.  Students will complete literature studies alongside self-study of leadership traits, goal setting and passion learning.  Personal reflection and biography study are tools students will use to examine the significance of giftedness in adulthood.  Senior High Enrichment earns a .25 credit independent study on a pass/fail basis for students in grades 9-12. Prerequisite: Gifted identification in superior cognitive (ability scores).

CREDIT: .25                 LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Family and Consumer Science

Fine Arts

The Ohio CORE requires students to complete at least one year of fine arts taken any time in grades 7-12.

Everyday Foods

This course delves into the world of healthy foods and living a healthy lifestyle.  The day-to- day lessons deal with basic food preparation, label reading and shopping, including the benefits of organic, free range, non-hormone, and kosher.  Nutritional information will be examined, as will restaurants and menus. Students will learn and apply kitchen techniques to help sustain the environment. This course is offered to students in grades 9 - 12.

CREDIT: .5                            LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Advanced Foods

This course takes food preparation to a higher level.  Students will explore foods from around the world and participate in menu planning.  Students will also learn about safety in kitchen and appropriate procedures in handling food.  This course will also examine and analyze industry practices. The prerequisite for this course is Everyday Foods.  This course is offered to students in grades 9 - 12.

CREDIT: .5                            LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

It's All Material

Beginning sewing will be the focus of this course.  Students will become familiar with machine use, including sewing basic patterns, using the pedal and special functions, and learning the “touch” of a sewing machine.  Students will create unique pieces that follow the traditional elements of sewing. This course is offered to students in grades 9 - 12.  It will only be offered in odd numbered years (2019-20, 2021-22, etc.)  Therefore, this course will NOT be offered in 2018-19.

CREDIT: .5                            LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Rags to Runway

Students will be introduced to the elements of fashion design.  Working with patterns and textile types, they will focus on the style, function, and form of modern fashion.  Students will also learn about trends, classical looks, and experimental styles. Cutting edge and couture will also be explored.  This course is offered to students in grades 9 - 12.  Prerequisite: It’s all Material. This course will only be offered in odd numbered years (2019-20, 2021-22, etc.)  Therefore, this course will NOT be offered in 2018-19.

CREDIT: .5                LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Needle Arts

Needle Arts will introduce students to a variety of basic techniques in the arts of knitting, crocheting, cross stitch, and embroidery.  During this course students will create samples and simple projects using these skills. This course is offered to students in 9 - 12. This course will only be offered in odd numbered years (2019-20, 2021-22, etc.)  Therefore, this course will NOT be offered in 2018-19.

CREDIT: .5                            LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

 

My 1st Home

Students will learn all of the intricate details of owning a home from several angles.  Students will learn about the elements of construction and contracts. The course will walk students through the purchase and home inspection, move to taking possession, then on to designing a room and making a house a home.  Troubleshooting in terms of finance, home maintenance, and basic care will be discussed. This course is offered to students in grades 9 - 12. It will only be offered in even numbered years (2018-19, 2020-21, etc.)

CREDIT: .5  LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Family Life

This course deals with all of the idiosyncrasies of being a part of a family, including the stages of development, parent/child relationships, sibling dynamics, and intrapersonal relationships.  Students will also explore loss, violence, trauma, and difficulties faced. Students will also create lesson plans for working with children. This course is offered to students in grades 9 - 12.  It will only be offered in even numbered years (2018-19, 2020-21, etc.)

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Art

Art I

Art I focuses on artistic skill development and the use of many different art materials. Art I gives students the basic understanding and skills necessary for its practice. Elements of design along with an introduction to art appreciation and criticism will be explored. This course is open to all students who are interested in expanding their creativity and appreciation for art as well as the more focused artist as a prerequisite to Art II. A student who has successfully completed 3 of the 4 junior high art courses (Drawing and Painting One, Drawing and Painting Two, Sculpture One, or Sculpture Two) may skip this Art I requirement and advance to Art II with the junior high art teacher’s approval.  

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

 

Art II

Art II is designed for the more serious art student who wishes to advance their skills to a higher level. Students will go further in-depth in their skills and understanding of all types of media. Drawing, painting, and sculpture will be explored with a focus on technique, design, and expression. Students will receive more individual attention and instruction than Art I students. Serious art students should plan to take this course their freshmen or sophomore year, however it is open to juniors and seniors as well.  Prerequisites: Art I or 3 of the 4 junior high art courses (Drawing and Painting One, Drawing and Painting Two, Sculpture One, or Sculpture Two) AND the junior high art teacher’s approval.  

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Art III

The first part of Art III focuses on 3D design using clay with several different types of hand building and pottery techniques.  The second part of Art III focuses on painting skills and the use of several types of painting media. The third part of Art III will focus on the student’s individual needs to compile a well-rounded portfolio. Projects will be individually based on the student’s talents, interests, and requirements for post-secondary educational plans. Serious art students should consider taking this course during their sophomore or junior year if they plan to enroll in the AP Studio Art Class. Sophomore, junior, and senior artists are also encouraged to take this course even if they do not wish to take Studio Art AP in the future.   Prerequisite: Art II.  

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Art Encounters

 Art Encounters focuses on artful creativity and the use of many different art materials. The Art Encounters course will expose students to many different types artistic experiences for appreciation and enjoyment. Coursework may include (but is not limited to) things like: ceramic clay slab work, clay bead making, knot tying projects, calligraphy/other lettering designs, henna art, Zentangel art, mosaics, woven baskets, and/or printmaking projects. This course will enhance any art student's experience, but is not intended to prepare them for upper level art classes, or Advanced Placement. Art Encounters is open to all students in grades 10-12 who are interested in expanding their creativity and appreciation for different types of art, however juniors and seniors will be given first consideration.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

AP Studio Art

The Advanced Placement program in Studio Art is intended for the highly motivated artist. AP artwork involves considerable amounts of time both in and out of class. Students will submit a portfolio to the College Board for scoring at the end of the year with work demonstrating quality, breadth, and the student’s chosen area of concentration. Students must meet with the AP Art teacher in the spring of the year prior to enrollment for orientation and summer assignments. Admission to the class must be given by the instructor and will be based on the student’s current portfolio, grades, and completed application. Please see instructor for application prior to course enrollment.  This course is open to both junior and senior artists. Prerequisite: Art II and III.  Summer work is required and is assigned in May.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Portfolio Development

The Portfolio Development class is for the junior or senior art student who wishes to produce high quality artwork to build their portfolio and pursue their talent and individual artistic style yet not submit artwork to the College Board for AP credit. Portfolio Development is strongly recommended for junior students who plan to enroll in AP Studio Art their senior year as a way to build the breadth section of the AP submission requirements. Senior students who took AP their junior year and would like another year of art without the pressure of submission to the College Board are also strongly encouraged to enroll. Prerequisite: Art II and Art III.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Graphic Arts I

Graphic Art offers instruction in the areas of graphic design such as: digital photography, photo restoration, image manipulation, digital scanning, desktop publishing, poster design, t-shirt design, and advertisement. Most projects will require the use of a computer each day in class. Students are required to obtain and provide many different types of original digital images; access to a digital camera is highly recommended. Flash Drives are required for each student enrolled in Graphic Art. This course is open to students in grades 10-12, however juniors and seniors will be given first consideration.

Advanced Graphic Arts

Advanced Graphic Art is an extension of the Graphic Art I class. Students who wish to continue to explore graphic design may take this course as an independent study on a pass/fail basis. Students must receive permission from the instructor to take this course. An application must be filled out and signed by the instructor prior to enrollment. Please see instructor for application prior to course enrollment. (Availability and class schedule of the instructor may affect student acceptance). In this independent study course students are expected to be self-motivated to produce original work. This course is open to students in grades 10-12, however juniors and seniors will be given first consideration.  Prerequisite: Graphic Art I and application process.

CREDIT: .25                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Music

Senior High Concert Band

Senior High Concert Band is a co-curricular course for those students in grades 9 through 12 who have progressed sufficiently on their instruments to perform and interpret more advanced musical literature.  Emphasis is placed on advanced musicianship, public performance in concert, marching, solo and ensemble work, and music as an art. The band program seeks to build character through music and the band medium.  It strives to give each member of the band a finer appreciation of music through performance experiences. There are requirements outside the school day for this course including summer marching band camp (end of July); all home and away football games; Wednesday evening marching rehearsals (7-9 pm; 1st quarter); 2 lunch rehearsals per week during marching season; 1 lunch sectional per week during concert season; home practice; and participation in required performances as indicated on the high school band performance calendar (published in April of the previous year).  Senior Band meets five periods each week, plus the additional rehearsals and performances listed above.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Senior High Wind Ensemble

Senior High Wind Ensemble is the most advanced band in the senior high curriculum.  Students selected by audition will study and perform advanced high school wind band literature.  Students will also prepare solos and ensembles for public and/or contest performance.  Only students ready to commit to a high level of personal focus, discipline and practice should audition for this ensemble.   There are requirements outside the school day for this course including summer marching band camp (end of July); all home and away football games; Wednesday evening marching rehearsals (7-9 pm; 1st quarter); 2 lunch rehearsals per week during marching season; 1 lunch sectional per week during concert season; home practice; and participation in required performances as indicated on the high school band performance calendar (published in April of the previous year).  Senior High Wind Ensemble meets five periods each week, plus the additional rehearsals and performances listed above. Enrollment: Grades 10 – 12 by audition.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Senior High Jazz Band

Senior High Jazz Band is for advanced instrumentalists (saxophone; trumpet; trombone; guitar; electric or acoustic bass; piano; drums; percussion) in grades 9-12 who have the desire to participate in a jazz band of disciplined, committed, focused, and hard-working jazz learners.  Note: guitar players must be able to read music notation and chord symbols. Students will study and perform music found in the standard big band jazz repertoire.  Students selected for the Oakwood Senior High Jazz Band will be expected to practice on their own as necessary to be a contributing member of the ensemble.  Students will earn .25 high school credit for successfully completing this course. This class will meet two days per week, “0” period, (7:30-8:10 a.m.) Additional requirements: 1) permission of Jazz Band Director; and 2) concurrent enrollment in the High School Band, Orchestra, Choir or Music Theory unless a scheduling conflict makes such enrollment impossible.

CREDIT: .25                         LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Concert Orchestra

Concert Orchestra is a continuing course for those students in grade 9 who have progressed sufficiently on their instruments to perform and interpret more advanced musical repertoire.  Emphasis is placed on advanced musicianship, public performance in concert, solo and ensemble work, and music as an art. The orchestra program seeks to build character through music and the orchestra medium.  It strives to give each member of the orchestra a finer appreciation of music through performance experiences. Rehearsal, home practice, and participation in scheduled events are a part of the course. This course may require up to two additional instructional periods per week during the “0” period, (7:30-8:15 a.m.).

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Symphony Orchestra

Symphony Orchestra is the most advanced orchestra in the high school curriculum and is for students in grades 10-12 who will perform advanced high school orchestra repertoire.  Students will also prepare solos and ensembles for public and/or contest performance.  Only students ready to commit to a high level of personal focus, discipline, and practice should register for this elite ensemble.  This ensemble will also perform with the Senior High Wind Ensemble to give the students a full-orchestra experience. Enrollment:  Grades 10 – 12.  This course may require up to two additional instructional periods per week during the “0” period, (7:30-8:15 a.m.).

CREDIT: 1           LENGTH FULL YEAR

Senior High Honors Orchestra

Senior High Honors Orchestra is for the advanced string players (violin; viola; cello; bass) in grades 9-12 who want an extra challenge in addition to Concert and Symphony Orchestra. Students will study and perform music of an advanced degree from baroque to modern music. Students selected for the Oakwood Senior High Honors Orchestra will be expected to practice on their own as necessary to be a contributing member of the ensemble. This group will require discipline, commitment, focus and hard work. Students selected for the Senior High Honors Orchestra will be expected to be warmed up and ready to play by 7:30 a.m. Students will earn .25 high school credit for successfully completing this course. This class will meet two days per week, “0” period, (7:30-8:10 a.m.) Enrollment: Audition. Additional Requirements: Concurrent enrollment in the High School Concert or Symphony Orchestra unless a scheduling conflict makes such enrollment impossible.

CREDIT: .25          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Basic Guitar

Through this class, students will receive the tools necessary to play the guitar at a basic-to-intermediate level.  This will be done through a hands-on approach that incorporates a significant amount playing along with popular recordings that emphasize fundamental guitar chords and techniques.  Although emphasis will be placed on practicality for the non-“formally trained” musician, basic music theory concepts will be explored, such as note names and simple rhythms. In addition to learning existing songs, students will have the opportunity to create their own chord progressions and rhythmic patterns.   A general history of popular guitarists will also be covered. (This class alternates every other year with Advanced Guitar)

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

 

Advanced Guitar

In this class, students will explore techniques and terminology necessary to become a well-rounded guitarist.  Students will learn to read tablature, perform scales and melodies, and demonstrate advanced techniques through playing songs in a variety of styles and genres. Students will also be introduced to improvisation (soloing) and composition (songwriting). Students must have previously taken Basic Guitar or have approval from the instructor to take this class.  (This class alternates every other year with Basic Guitar)

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

Concert Choir

All students in grades 9 through 12 are welcome in this ensemble of mixed voices.  Students will study a variety of choral pieces and will learn how to hone the pitch, tone, and quality of one’s voice.  Participation in scheduled events is a part of the course. This class is a requirement for Symphonic Chorale.

CREDIT: 1                LENGTH: FULL YEAR

 

Symphonic Chorale

This ensemble is designed to serve talented/gifted choral students.  It is an audition-based course and requires prior choral experience. It is expected that the attainments and performance of this group be outstanding.  Participation in scheduled events is a part of the course. Interested students should see the instructor for more information. Enrollment:  Grades 10 – 12 by audition; prior choral experience required.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

 

Synergy/The Axidentals

Members will perform in the contemporary a cappella style. Students will be auditioned and selected by the choral director. Based on auditions, students will be placed in The Axidentals (preparatory ensemble) or placed in Synergy, the highest level. Interested students in grades 9-12 must be able to sing in the pop/a cappella style and, therefore, must audition in this style. Auditions will also be held for a vocal percussionist. Both groups will perform at concerts and community functions. Students will earn .5 high school credit for successfully completing this course. This class will meet three days per week, “0” period, (7:30-8:10 a.m.) Enrollment: Audition. Additional Requirements: Concurrent enrollment in the High School Concert Choir or Symphonic Chorale unless a scheduling conflict makes such enrollment impossible.

CREDIT: .5          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

Music Theory

This is a basic introductory course in Music Theory. Students will learn notation skills, rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation, scale construction, sight singing, and part writing.  This course is open to students in grades ten through twelve who have both an extensive musical background and permission of the instructor.

CREDIT: .5                 LENGTH: ONE SEMESTER

AP Music Theory

AP Music Theory is an advanced, high-level study of music theory designed to prepare students for the AP exam.  Students will learn advanced techniques in notation, dictation, sight singing, and harmonic construction. Admission to the class is by instructor permission based upon musical aptitude and demonstrated competence in theory and performance and an AP test is required.

CREDIT: 1          LENGTH: FULL YEAR

PLEASE NOTE:  Much classical and seasonal music literature was written for specific religions.  Some of these pieces of literature may be required for performance in OMEA competition, etc.  Although we try to select literature sensitive to the beliefs of all our students, from time to time religion-based and seasonal music may be performed.

Program of Study (Listed by Department)

*NOTE:  Grade level listed is a recommendation only.  Individual needs and teacher recommendations are always considered in the final selection of courses.  Therefore, some students may schedule classes at other times than the grade level mentioned.

 

Department Course # Subject Recommended Grade Credit
English 0120 English I 9 1.00
  0130 English IH 9 1.00
  0220 English II 10 1.00
  0230 English II H 10 1.00
  0240 English II HH 10 1.00
  0320 English III 11 1.00
  0330 English III H 11 1.00
  0340 AP English III 11 1.00
  0420 English IV 12 1.00
  0430 English IV H/CCP 12 1 ( or 1.5 CCP)
  0440 AP English IV 12 1.00
  0501 Yearbook 9-12 1.00
  0510 Newspaper 9-12 1.00
  0530 Academic Decathlon 9-12 1.00
  0600 Public Speaking 9-12 .50
  0620 Dramatics 9-12 .50
World Language 4110 French I 9 1.00
  4130 French II 10 1.00
  4140 French II H 9 1.00
  4150 French III 11 1.00
  4160 French III H 10 1.00
  4170 French IV 11-12 1.00
  4171 AP French V 12 1.00
  4200 Spanish I 9 1.00
  4220 Spanish II 10 1.00
  4230 Spanish II H 9 1.00
  4240 Spanish III 11 1.00
  4260 Spanish III H 10 1.00     
  4250 Spanish IV 11-12 1.00
  4270 AP Spanish V 12 1.00
  4300 CCP Am. Sign Language I 9-12 1.00
  4305 CCP Am. Sign Language II 9-12 1.00
Math 2100 Algebra I 9

1.00
(.5 x 2)

  2210 Geometry H 9

1.00
(.5 x 2)

  2220 Algebra II H 10

1.00
(.5 x 2)

  2300 Algebra II 10-11

1.00
(.5 x 2)

  2320 Pre-Calculus H 11

1.00 
(.5 x 2)

  2310 Pre-Calculus 11-12

1.00
(.5 x 2)

  2330 CCP Business Calc. 12

1/1.5 CCP

  2400 AP Calc. (AB) 12 1.00
  2410 AP Calc. (BC) 12 1.00
  2425 AP Statistics 11-12 1.00
  2450 Transitions to College Mathematics 12

1.00
(.5 x 2)

Science 3100 Physical Science 9

1.00 
(.5 x 2)

  3200 Biology 9-10 1.00
  3205 Biology in Society 10-12 1.00
  3300 Chemistry 10-12 1.00
  3400 Physics 11-12 1.00
  3600 Astronomy 11-12 .50
  3700 Forensic Science I 11-12 .50
  3705 Forensic Science II 11-12 .50
  3800 Environmental Science 11-12 .50
  3201 AP Biology 11-12 .50
  3310 AP Chemistry 11-12 1.00
  3410 AP Physics C 12 1.00
  3500 CCP Human Anatomy 12 1.00 (or 2 CCP)
  6510 Principles of Engineering 10-12 1.00
  6520 Biotechnical Engineering 10-12 1.00
Engineering 6500 Introduction to Engineering Design 9-12 1.00
  6510 Principles of Engineering 10-12 1.00
  6520 Biotechnical Engineering 10-12

1.00

Social Studies 1210 Modern World Studies 9 1.00
  1220 AP World History 9 1.00
  1300 Modern American History 10 1.00
  1310 AP US History 10 1.00
  1340 CCP Western Civ. 11-12 .50 (or 1 CCP)
  1345 CCP The West and the World 11-12 .50 (or 1 CCP)
  1320 Age of Antiquity 11-12 .50
  1350 AP European History 11-12 1.00
  1410 Psychology 11-12 .50
  1460 Comparative Religion 11-12 .50
  1480 Civics: American Government... 11-12 1.00
  1495 AP US Government and Politics 11-12 1.00
  1498 CCP International Politics 11-12 .50 (or 1 CCP)
  1499 AP Comparative Government and Politics 11-12 .50
Business 5600 Learn Your ABCD'S in Accounting 11-12 .50
  5610 Business Basics 9-10 .50
  5620 Law and Your Life 11-12 .50
  5630 Make it Matter with Marketing 10-12 .50
  5640 Wall Street 101 11-12 .50
Computer Science 9000 Web Communications I 9-12 .50
  9010 Web Communications II 9-12 .50
  9020 Film and Video Production 9-12 .50
  9030 Broadcast Journalism 9-12 1.00
  9035 Computer Science: Email Etiquette 9-12 .25
  9040 Computer Science: Cyber Security 9-12 .50
  9045 Computer Science: Internet Safety 9-12 .25
  9050 Computer Programming 9-12 .50
Family and Consumer Sciences 7170 Everyday Foods 9-12 .50
  7180 Advanced Foods 9-12 .50
  7130 My 1st Home 9-12 .50
  7160 Family Life 9-12 .50
Fine Arts 6110 Art I 9-12 .50
  6120 Art II 9-12 1.00
  6200 Art III 10-12 1.00
  6220 Art Encounters 10-12 .50
  6210 AP Studio Art 11-12 1.00
  6215 Portfolio Development 11-12 1.00
  7600 Graphic Arts I 11-12 .50
  7610 Advanced Graphic Arts 11-12 .25
Music 8120 SH Concert Band 9-12 1.00
  8160 SH Wind Ensemble 10-12 1.00
  8150 SH Jazz Band 9-12 .25
  8130 Concert Orchestra 9 1.00
  8140 Symphony Orchestra 10-12 1.00
  8170 SH Honors Orchestra 9-12 .25
  8220 Advanced Guitar 9-12 .50
  8300 Concert Choir 9-12 1.00
  8310 Symphonic Chorale 10-12 1.00
  8320 A Capella 9-12 .50
  8400 Music Theory 10-12 .50
  8410 AP Music Theory 11-12 1.00
Health and Physical Education 9100 Physical Education I 9-10 .25
  9110 Physical Education II 9-10 .25
  9210 Advanced P.E. 11-12 .50
  9300 Health Education 9 .50
Enrichment 9826 SH Enrichment 9-12 .25